The Book Indian Depredations in Utah

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The following are just notes from Mr.. Gottfredson's research journal interesting historical facts about the Black Hawk War in Utah.

Sorry, this is NOT Utah's Black Hawk! This is a photo of a drawing of a Kiowa Apache man called Black Hawk. This photo originates from the archives of the Smithsonian.

The photo above has long been said to be Black Hawk. This is a photo of a drawing of a Kiowa Apache man called "Black Hawk." This photo originates from the archives of the Smithsonian. And it's interesting the name "Black Hawk" is not in the Apache language either. There is no known photo of Utah's Black Hawk.

The horse then was sought after by all the Indian tribes which quickly brought the Timpanogos/Shoshoni Nation into power. They became the pivotal source and supplier of horses to all the other tribes. Once they acquired the gun they were a fierce and proud people.

The Shoshone People were first called the Chickimec (the Dog People) then there was three divisions, the Chickimec became the Nokoni, the Aztec, and Hopi (Moki). The Nokoni became the Shoshoni Nation which split into five bands, the Snake, Bannock, Ute, Comanche and Paiute. According to The Dominguez Escalante Journal: Their Expedition Through Colorado Utah Arizona and New Mexico in 1776 , Escalante describes having come in contact with a Native peoples who called themselves "Timpanogostzis" whose leader was Turunianchi, who occupied what is now known as Utah. Dominguez named Mt. Timpanogos, Timpanogos River (Provo River), Timpanogos Lake (Great Salt Lake) and Timpanogos valley (Utah Valley) in honor of these people, an honor that remains to this day. So it follows when the Mormon pioneers led by Brigham Young arrived in Utah territory in 1847, the Native peoples they first encountered were the Snake-Shoshoni Timpanogos Indian Tribe led by the seven grandsons of Turunianchi Tabby, Wakara, Arropeen, Sanpitch, Grospean, Amman, and Sowiette. Sanpitch is believed to be the father of Black Hawk.

Following the invasion of the Conquistadors who robbed them of their gold and enslaved a good number of them, then came the fur trappers. During the years of the 1700's to the early 1800's trappers would all but empty the rivers and streams of Oregon, Idaho and Utah of the beaver population. Literally millions of pounds of pelts would be shipped to Europe making fur merchants wealthy beyond belief. During this time and subsequent years to follow the British, French and Americans would divvy up Indian land, waging war against each other when necessary to gain control.

Through it all Timpanogos would emerge victorious having survived wave after wave of Euro-invasions. So when the Mormons arrived in 1847 and settled in the arid Salt Lake valley the valley had long become the crossroads of the west as trappers, explorers and the like passed through on their way to Oregon, and California. But an old medicine chief Wuna Mucca of the Timpanogos had prophesied the coming of the missionaries decades before their arrival. And come they did, to worship God almighty, to save the heathens from hell, and get rich.

Utah Black Hawk War Treaties

There were no treaties made between the Timpanogos and the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints or the state of Utah. They were only agreements. Only the federal government had the authority to make treaties with the Indian people. - Floyd O'Neil

Even so, according to Utah history accounts, "treaties" were made. But they were never ratified by the United States Government. Yet the Native people were made to believe they were legal and honored those agreements, whereas the Church changed and modified those agreements at will.

The following are the words of Timpanogos leaders (brothers) expressing how they felt about signing treaties. The year was 1865. They were discussing the Spanish Fork Treaty:

Chief Kanosh spoke (Bean interpreting)

"We have agreed that four chiefs shall do this talking. I do not see what use it would be to trade the land where there are so few of us whatever we would trade for would be all gone soon whether blankets or hats or shirts or money the money would soon go in the stores and the other things would soon be gone. If the Americans buy the land where would the Mormons who live here go? (The Timpanogoss had been told by Brigham Young if the Timpanogoss don't turn over the land to the Mormons the U.S. Government would take it anyway.) Will the lord take them up to his country? I think this is the Mormon's land, the bishops land with the Utahs let them all live here together. I do not want to cut the land in two let it all remain as it is. It is all right to let us stay where we are let me stay at corn creek and visit back and forth. Suppose Brigham our eldest brother was to die where would the Indians all run to when we know he is at salt lake city it is all right Brigham is the great captain of all for he does not get mad when he hears of his brothers and friends being killed as the California captains do the best thing is for the superintendent to give us our blankets and shirts and not talk about trading the land but let us live and be friendly together give all of us blankets and shirts squaws and all and do not make us feel poor but clothe us up."

Sanpitch rose to speak Bean interpreting

"I do not question the paper but I do not want to trade the land nor the title to the land it used to be lord's land but now it is the Mormon's land and ours. The maker of the land is probably dead and buried now. (?) But this is good heavy land lots of water and rocks and I want it to stay here and us to stay here with it. The whites make farms get wood and live here on the land and we never traded the land let them live here and us live here too. (While speaking the chief became increasingly excited and closed angrily.) If the talk is for us to trade the land in order to get the presents I do not want any blankets or any clothing I would rather go without than to give up my title to the land I occupy."

Brigham Young rose to speak Huntington interpreter

"San pitch Sow e ett Tabby and all of you I want you to understand what I say to you I am looking for your welfare if you do not sell your land to the government they will take it whether you are willing to sell it or not this is the way they have done in California and Oregon if you go to Uintah they will build you houses make you a farm give you cows oxen clothing blankets and many other things you will want and then the treaty that colonel Irish has here gives you the privilege of coming back here on a visit you can fish hunt pick berries dig roots and we can visit together the land does not belong to you nor to me nor to the government it belongs to the lord but our father at Washington is disposed to make you liberal presents to let the Mormons live here if you will go over there and have your houses built and get your property and money we are perfectly willing you should visit with us do you understand that Kanosh?" Kanosh and others "We do" Young "We feel to do you good and I know that this treaty is just as liberal and does everything for you and for your people that can be done now if you can understand this you can see at once that we do not want anything to wrong any of you Indians it is enough."

Tabby spoke Bean interpreter

"The hearts of the Indians are full they want to think wait until tomorrow let us go back to our lodges and talk and smoke over what has been said today the Indians are not ready now to give up the land. They never thought of such a thing."

Sow e ett Bean interpreter

"I am the father of you all. I have always been a friend of the Americans Mr.. Young he has never thrown away my friendship for the Americans. Superintendent Irish that is what everybody says of you. After awhile Brigham and the Mormons came here I saw him and he was my son my friend when I met Young we talked and understood each other. Me and my children the Utah's and Brigham and his children. When some of my children stole horses and acted bad did I break my friendship? No never. I do not want to see it. I am old my heart is very weak now but it is good."

Though they agreed to the terms of the so called Treaty, and the Timpanogos's lived up to their words, aside from some token gifts given to the Timpanogos's Brigham never kept his promises. The Treaty was never ratified by the U.S. Government while the Mormon took away hundreds of thousands of square miles of land and forced the Timpanogoss onto the Uinta reservation where nearly 50% died from starvation. It was a matter of which of the three would control the land, the Timpanogoss, the Mormons, or the United States Government. A year later Sanpitch was murdered.

The Old Peace Treaty Tree

1866 July-August Bishop Canute Peterson of Ephraim, Utah paid a visit to the ailing Timpanogos leader Black Hawk who had been wounded in battle at Gravely Ford near Richfield, Utah. Taking gifts of sugar, hams, bread, beads, molasses, tea, coffee, tobacco, flour, medicines and clothing. The Chief was grateful for the presents and a friendship developed, which put a partial end to the hostilities. Five important chiefs called upon Canute Peterson's home and established peace pacts. As they talked, Sarah Peterson prepared a meal of the good things that could be brought from the cellar and pantry. After the meal, Black Hawk and Canute went across the road and smoked the pipe of peace under the old juniper tree, now referred to as the "peace treaty tree." The old Juniper tree still stands on the west bank of the creek. They agreed that they would not fight as long as water continued to run in the creek. A Black Hawk Peace Treaty marker was erected there in 1987. (See the Peace Treaty Tree story here.)

Chief Tabby Story

In the spring of 1867 at Heber City, a Timpanogos was captured after butchering a cow. He expected to be killed but Bishop Murdock told him he would be released if he would carry a personal message to Chief Tabby requesting a meeting to negotiate an end to the long and needless war. After Chief Tabby received Joseph’s message, a government Indian agent tried to meet with Tabby but Tabby said he would only talk with “Old Murdock!”

1867 Aug.. 12th several accounts explain that while near the Uinta reservation Black Hawk and his warriors in a prearranged meeting, met with Indian Superintendent Franklin Head. The Indian people, it appears, had respect for Franklin. Well, it is said that Black Hawk told him that he and his warriors were tired of fighting and wanted peace.

Black Hawk, with his massive army could have caused far more depredations to the saints, and certainly had just cause. But in a surprising change of tactics he elected to give up his campaign of vengeance to take a more altruistic course. But, at that moment all hopes of there ever being freedom, or holding onto their land... was gone. And Black Hawk knowing that the Transcontinental Railroad would soon be completed meant an even greater influx of Anglos into Utah.

The Chief knew what he was doing. Taking upon himself the agony of his people, Black Hawk handed Franklin his knife and would ask him to cut off his hair to symbolically demonstrate his sincerity in wanting peace. To understand what happened here, we need to examine closely the cultural beliefs of the Utah Indian before we can appreciate this powerful gesture. This was no small matter reader, and is well worth the effort to understand for it underscores the humanity and humility of Black Hawk as a leader. Making a personal atonment was common all the way down to south America among the Mayan. Black Hawk is not surrendering, he changing his tactics to ensure the survival of his people. Remarkable person to make such a gesture.

1867 August 17th, Black Hawk met with his brother Chief Tabby, who had made preparations to join his warriors with Black Hawk's men. Tabby had sent the women and children to an area where they would be safe, it was time to settle the score with the Mormons. But, Black Hawk convinced his brother that it would be better to end the war. The odds were clearly against them, to continue would mean certain annihilation of their people.

1867 August 19th, hundreds of Northern Timpanogos people accompanied Chief Tabby and his six sub-chiefs went to Heber City. They went directly to Tabby's old friend Joseph Murdock’s home at 115 East 300 North where they camped in his yard and pasture. The following day, August 20, four of Murdock’s five wives who were living in Heber City, and the townsfolk prepared a feast on a lot owned by John Carroll. This lot is located across the street from the Murdock home. A large pit was dug to roast enough beef to feed everyone. Each woman had been asked to bake a dozen loaves of bread. Rows of tables were loaded with corn and whatever the townsfolk could find in their pantries and larders to feed their guests.

The feasting and talk lasted all day. Murdock and Tabby exchanged a few simple gifts. The leaders then went across the street to an upstairs room in Murdock’s home where a peace pipe was smoked and a treaty of friendship was signed. Chief Tabby signed his name and the six sub-chiefs made their marks.

This peace agreement ended the fighting between the settlers in Heber Valley and the Northern Timpanogos people. It was one of the first agreements in a series of peace pacts made between Mormon settlers and Timpanogos leaders that lead to the eventual end of the Black Hawk War.
 

The news of Black Hawk's tactical maneuver spread quickly. Brigham Young grasped the moment, and took credit for having reconciled the war through vigilance, and kindness, underscoring his policy “to feed them and not fight them” had paid off. The Rocky Mountain News paper quoted Brigham Young's boasting, "If you want to get rid of the Indians try and civilize them," speaks to Brigham's 'two hearts.' See Brigham's Discourses here.)

Black Hawk did not surrender to Brigham Young. Taking upon himself the agony of defeat, and the humiliation of his people, if he surrendered, he surrendered to a higher power, for he knew it was futile and wrong to expose his people to more torment, while fighting a loosing battle. But the Chief's fight for freedom didn't end here. He follows his heart and changes his strategy as he campaigns for peace three more years prior to his death in 1870. ( See treaties click here )

Conclusion: There was only one treaty signed between the Utes and the United States government that was ratified. That treaty was in 1868. (See Treaty Here) The Timpanogos never signed the treaty leaving the Uinta Reservation intact..

In many ways the Native people of Utah continue to suffer following the Black Hawk War. They continue to suffer, from limited land-base, scattered and substandard homes sites, intertribal political strife, poverty, poor health, and ineffective educational programs for their children. In 1861 President Lincoln set aside five million acres of land which became known as the Uinta Reservation. The Colorado 10th District Court ruled in a recent case, UTE INDIAN TRIBE OF THE UINTA OURAY RESERVATION vs STATE OF UTAH, remains intact.

The Paiute suffered again late in their history, "when, during the 1950s, after decades of failed policies and programs, the U.S. government under President Eisenhower implemented the Relocation/Termination Programs as the official Indian policy of the Federal Government" and as a result their reservation lands where taken from the them.

Native American Indians were not given citizenship status until 1924. In Utah the right to vote was not granted to Utah Indians until in 1990's.

The American Indian Religious Act of 1978 extended the right to Native Indians to protect sacred lands religious practices, Rare film footage taken at a demonstration on the steps of the capital building in Salt Lake reveals blatant opposition to religious freedom in 1983. Native Indians continue to struggle for their rights to this day.

The Bear River Maassacre

The massacre at Bear River (Known as massacre at Boa Ogoi by the Lemhi Shoshone) occurred January 29, 1863. It was the third out of six massacres in Utah, but by far one the worst ever in U.S. history. Over five hundred Shoshoni, innocent of any wrong doing, were slain by Mormon militia and U.S. army commander Colonel Patrick Edward Connor—among them, old men, 90 women and children. After the slaughter ended, soldiers went through the Indian village raping women and using axes to bash in the heads of women and children who were already dying of wounds, "many of the Squaws were killed because they would not submit to lie down and be ravished." Eyewitness William Hull wrote: "Never will I forget the scene, dead bodies were everywhere. I counted eight deep in one place and in several places they were three to five deep; all in all we counted nearly four hundred; two-thirds of this number being women and children. We found two Indian women alive whose thighs had been broken by the bullets. Two little boys and one little girl about three years of age were still living. The little girl was badly wounded, having eight flesh wounds in her body ..."

Chief Bear Hunter and sub-Chief Lemhi both were killed. Mormon troops led by a United States Army Colonel, burned 75 Indian lodges, took possession of 1,000 bushels of wheat and flour, and 175 Shoshone horses. While the troops cared for their wounded and took their dead back to Camp Douglas in Salt Lake City for burial, hundreds of Indians' bodies were left on the field for the wolves and crows for nearly two years. Brigham Young obliged the federal governments request by supplying Connor with cavalry troops from the Utah Militia. Although the Mormon settlers in Cache Valley expressed their gratitude for "the movement of Col. Connor as an intervention of the Almighty" in their behalf, the Bear River Massacre was a brushed-aside-ignored-history in Utah. - John Alton Peterson Utah's Black Hawk War - Rod Miller's Massacre at Bear River (Also see video Bear River Massacre - with Will Bagley)

"The Bear River Massacre has been ignored. It was not in the interest of key players—the military and the Mormons—to remember.." - Salt Lake Tribune

The six massacres in Utah resulted in a total of some 766 deaths of Native Americans in Utah.

 

ARROPEEN - Brother of Walkara

ANTONGUER aka Antonga aka Antoñgua aka Black Hawk - Historical accounts use the name Antonga, or Antonguer saying that Black Hawk went by this name also. Names were often spelled phonetically. Accounts also theorize that the name is French and that the name may have been given to Black Hawk by French trappers. I argue the name is Spanish/American. I have never been able to find the name in the French language.  I believe the name is not French but Spanish. Spelled "Antoñgua." Translation of this name is not available, but it does exist in the Spanish language. How Black Hawk got this name is not known, however my theory is since the Timpanogos had considerable contact trading with the Mexicans, and they also occupied Utah territory the name was given to him by Mexican trappers and not French.

The exact date of birth of Antoñgua is not known, the best estimation is circa 1838.  

AUKEWAKETS - Taken prisoner at Manti and Brother VanBruen cut his throat, and held him to the ground until he died .

AUG-A-VOR-UN - Sub Chief of Black Hawk

BATTEST - Was shot point-blank through the head in his teepee at Cedar Valley.

BLUE SHIRT - Murdered at Battle Creek

*BOQUOBITS- Alleged assailant at Gunnison Massacre

*CARBOORITS- Alleged assailant at Gunnison Massacre

*Gunnison Massacre - Deseret News Article Vol. 4 March 30, 1854

*Several articles appeared in the Deseret News regarding the murder of the Gunnison party presenting strong evidence that Indians were not involved but were blamed for the event.

"Our present object is to call public attention to certain facts connected with the murder of Captain Gunnison and his party, which indicate that it was not the work of the Indians, as we were at first led to believe. We have conversed upon the subject with several old mountaineers, men who have spent a large portion of their lives in the Rocky Mountains, and who are familiar with the Indians of that region; and they have informed us that the facts and circumstances, as stated in the published accounts of the affair, indicate most strongly that it was not the work of the Indians. In the first place, the murder could not have been committed by the Pauvants, the tribe inhabiting the region of country in which it occurred, because Kern, and others of the party, were killed with firearms; and those Indians have no guns, and do not understand their use. The Utahs live remote from the spot where the tragedy was performed, and, besides, they are at peace with all white men, except the Mormons. Beale and Heap passed through the country of the Utahs without molestation of any kind. On the contrary, they were kindly received; game was killed for them; and the Indians informed them that they made war only upon the Mormons who had taken away their lands. Gunnison, also, had passed through the country of the Utahs, and they made no attack upon him. There are others, and still stronger circumstances, which, in the minds of those acquainted with Indian usage, are conclusive of the fact that the murder was not committed by them. Prominent among these, is the fact that the slain were not scalped. -- The scalp is the Indian's trophy. To the Indian warrior it is more valuable than booty. It is the proof of his valor, and confers upon him rank and distinction in his tribe. The accounts say that the bodies were mutilated; that both of Gunnison's arms were cut off; and one of Kern's. This proves that the authors of the deed were not so much hurried to have scalped their victims, if they had chosen to do so; for an arm is more difficult to remove than a scalp. Another circumstance is that notes, surveys, and other papers of the party were carried away. -- Papers are valueless to an Indian. He never takes them away, and usually scatters them upon the ground as useless.

DANITES

"The Danites were a fraternal organization founded by Latter Day Saints in June of 1838, at Far West in Caldwell County, Missouri. During their brief period of formal organization in Missouri, the Danites operated as a vigilante group and took a central role in the events of the Mormon War. The exact nature and scope of the organization, and its connection to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is a matter of some dispute among historians.

In June 1838, a group of zealous Mormons began meeting together in Far West under the leadership of Sampson Avard, Jared Carter, and George W. Robinson to discuss the problem of the dissenters. The group organized under the name "The Daughters of Zion," but they soon became known as the "Sons of Dan."

"I knew of many men being killed in Nauvoo by the Danites. It was then the rule that all the enemies of Joseph Smith should be killed, and I know of many a man who was quietly put out of the way by the orders of Joseph and his Apostles while the Church was there. It has always been a well understood doctrine of the church that it was right and praiseworthy to kill every person who spoke evil of the Prophet." - From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

DOCTOR BILL - Died of gun shot wound in self defense. Marysville, 1866.

GRASPERO

*HUNKOOTOOP- Alleged assailant at Gunnison Massacre

*JIM - Brother of Mareer- Alleged assailant at Gunnison Massacre

*JIMMY KNIGHTS - Shot Captain Gunnison during Gunnison massacre.- Alleged assailant at Gunnison Massacre

*KOONANTS - Son of Tom wants - Alleged assailant at Gunnison Massacre

LITTLE CHIEF - Timpenogos Attacked Wanship's band in 1847. It is said he lead Militia to the family of Black Hawk who allegedly stole cattle, which is not true it was his son Little Wolf. Black Hawk was only in his early teens at this time. It was Brigham Young who sounded the alarm his horses had been stolen. He ordered Capt. Scott to take 44 troops and deal with the thieves. Then when it was discovered Young's horses were not stolen, Scott and his men ignored Brigham's orders to return to Salt Lake and attacked and murdered Black Hawk's family. It became known as the Battle Creek Massacre.  

LITTLE WOLF- The son of Little Chief. Timpenogos Timpanogos, it is said he Led the Mormon Militia to the encampment of Kone and Blue shirt which commenced the Battle Creek Massacre. The question remains weather he volunteered or was threatened to tell Capt. Scott where the encampment was.

MOAB- Alleged assailant at Gunnison Massacre

NICQUINA

NUNKIBOOLITS- Alleged assailant at Gunnison Massacre

ANTERO

BATTISTE  Old Elk's brother. Brother to Tintic. Died from gun shot to the head at point blank range by white man, in Tintic's tent, they were camped about a mile from Cedar Fort. 1856

OLD BISHOP - Murdered by Richard A. Ivie, Y. Rufus Stoddard, and Gerome Zabrisky, he was then gutted and the cavity of his body filled with rocks and tossed in the Provo River. It was alleged he had stolen a shirt he was wearing. Historian Will Bagley states the cause was stolen cattle. His name was given him by whites.

OLD ELK aka (Pareyarts) aka (Big Elk) aka Para-yah, died from wounds at Fort Utah, after he had asked the Mormons for medicine as he was sick with measles, but was thrown out of the fort and refused help.

OLD MAREER - Took part in the Gunnison massacre 1853. Died from gun wound in skirmish at Meadow Creek. He had caused a slight wound on the chest of a white by jabbing him with an arrow because the white man was trying to take from Mareer his arrows during a peaceful exchange of gifts.

OLD PETNICH n/a

CHIEF BLACK HAWK Son of Sanpitch

CHIEF ANGIZEBL- Present during signing of treaty ending the Black Hawk War 1872

CHIEF ANTERO- Went to Washington and spoke with President Grant for help in ending the war.1872

CHIEF BEAR HUNTER - Murdered at Bear River Massacre1863

CHIEF KANOSH - Pahvant Chief-Went to Washington and spoke with President Grant for help in ending the war.1872... Born 1821, died 1884.

CHIEF KONE - Murdered at Battle Creek (blood relative to Black Hawk)

CHIEF LEMHI - Murdered at Bear River Massacre 1863

CHIEF MASHOQUOP Pahvant war Chief Father of  Old Mareer Father killed by white men.

CHIEF MOUNTAIN - aka Kibets wounded at Diamond Fork Battle. 1866. See also Black Hawk's Mission of Peace here.

CHIEF PETEETNEET - His son's held prisoner by Captain Hancock as ransom, was told he must sign a treaty before his sons would be released. He signed. Brigham Young then had a house built for him, a ploy to teach other Indians. Close friend of Tintic.

CHIEF ROMAN NOSE - (This was not his Timpanogos name, this is a name the whites called him) Sub Chief under Chief Kone killed in the Battle Creek Massacre. Five Natives killed, no whites, for stealing some cattle. Fought at Fort Utah.

CHIEF SAGWITCH- Escaped murder at Bear River Massacre 1863

CHIEF SANPETE - Father of Old Uintah circa 1750

CHIEF SAN-PITCH- Father of Black Hawk and Kibets (Mountain) Murdered by George Tucker and Dolph Bennett at Birch Canyon between Fountain Green and Moroni. 1865. Brother of Wakara.

CHIEF SOWIETTE - Wanted peace with the whites.

CHIEF TABIONA - Present during signing of treaty of 1868. Went to Washington and spoke with President Grant for help in ending the war.

CHIEF WANSHIP Snake-Shoshone

CHIEF WHITE HARE- Present during signing of treaty ending the Black Hawk War 1872

CHIEF WHITE HORSE - Led attack at Rocky Ford (aka Gravely Ford) near Vermillion, Utah. Two whites killed, one wounded. 1868. Black Hawk was wounded while trying to rescue White Horse.

CHIEF YENEWOODS- Well known by the whites. Refused to sign treaty at Manti 1865.

OPECARRY aka (Stick-In-The-Head) - Murdered at Battle Creek massacre. Timpenogos Timpanogos wanted peace with the whites. He got his name by whites, because he always wore a mahogany stick done up in his hair.

PANTS - Brother of Mashoquop - Alleged assailant at Gunnison Massacre

PEANITCH- Indian guide

PORTSOVIC n/a

SAM aka Toady- Alleged assailant at Gunnison Massacre

SANTIK - Murdered at Louder's Spring. - Express rider for Black Hawk

SANPITCH- Principal Timpanogos leader during Black Hawk War, was murdered by Dolf Bennett Father of Black Hawk and Tabby.

SHEGUMP - Murdered at Louder's Spring. Express rider for Black Hawk.

SHENANAGON - Sub Chief of Black Hawk killed Major Vance and Sergeant Houtz.

STICK IN THE HEAD - See Opecarry above.

SKIPOKE aka "Doctor Jacob"- Assailant at Gunnison Massacre

SQUASH HEAD - Killed himself rather than remain prisoner of Joseph Kelly and Bishop Don C. Johnson. He may have actually been murdered.

TABBY - son of Old Uinta. Brother of Walkara. Tabby was also brother of Black Hawk.

TACKWITCH - Murdered by Dolph Bennett, he cut his throat with a hunting knife.

TINTIC- Sub Chief of the Timpanogos - Murdered by gun shot when attacked by John Clark and George in is camp. 1856

TOMWANTS- Alleged assailant at Gunnison Massacre

WAHBITS- Alleged assailant at Gunnison Massacre

WALKARA - His grandfather was Turunianchi, and six brothers were Sowiette, Arropean, Sanpitch, Ammon, Tobia (Tabby), and Grospeen. uncle of Black Hawk. Walkara was born about 1808, and so had been a boy of about seven when his grandfather Sanpete had been murdered by the Spaniards. Walkara is a Shoshoni name means "hawk."

"WILD BILL" HICKMAN"... Hickman was baptized into The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1839 by John D. Lee. He later served as a personal bodyguard for Joseph Smith, Jr.. and Brigham Young. Hickman was a member of the Danites. In 1854 Hickman was elected to the Utah Territorial Legislature. He was an important figure in the Utah War (The Black Hawk War used to be called). He torched Fort Bridger and numerous supply trains of the Federal Army. He was a serial killer. (Also see Fort Utah here)

Around Sept. 1871, while under arrest for the murder of Richard Yates years earlier, Hickman wrote an autobiography/confession in which he confessed to numerous murders." - From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

UIN-PAH-QUINT
He was born about 1725 in the Uintah Basin and became chief of the Timpanogoss. In about 1755 Uin-pah-quint was challenged in his leadership by his brother, Pah-yampa. Uin-pah-quint was deposed and compelled the leave the Basin with a few of his loyal followers. He removed to the territory of his cousins, the Timpanogos Timpanogoss, on the banks of the Timpanogos River (Provo River). Because of a shortage of food, the Timpanogos urged them to move on southward and establish their own settlement. They moved to the Pequi-nary-no-quint (Spanish Fork River; the Timpanogos name for "Stinking Water" because of the nearby sulphur springs). Uin-pah-quint had three wives and many children. Three of his sons grew in stature and became chieftains over surrounding domains. Oquirrh became the leader of a tribe which lived in the Tooele Valley, on the western slope of the mountains which today bears his name; Pah-vaun moved farther south with his followers, who became known as the Pahvants, and settled near present day Nephi, on chicken Creek; the third son was known as Pan-a-pitch.

Timpanogos History: Dominguez and Escalante, they were welcomed in and fed, places prepared for them to stay while the runners were sent to bring our leader Turunianchi to meet with them. Turunianchi was at a camp north of us meeting with the other headman of the large Nation which is known today as the Shoshone. He came at the morning light to speak with the "big hats", they smoked, they talked, the "big hats" spoke of their god, and, when they left, as is our custom he sent them with a gift. A painted deer hide depicting the headmen of the Tribe, there were crosses painted on each to indicate we too believed in a higher power. We, as they, were people of prayer. It would be many years before we would once again be visited by a people wanting to share the concept of a higher power. We had met many people calling themselves trappers and traders, with them there would always barter, something our people knew as we had bartered and traded with each other as far back as can be spoken. These men came and went. Only a few choosing to stay and be part of the people. Our lives were untouched, the harmony and balance of being one with the earth remained intact. It was the summer of 1847 when our lives would be changed, a new people would come not like the "big hats" of old. These people would build fences, claim lands and disrupt our culture and way of life. Bringing confusion as they spoke God and peace while sharing sacks of flour laced with broken glass. Destroying us with what appeared to be acts of kindness. As our Timpanogos tribal leadersKanosh, Tabby, Washakie, Little Wolf, Wanship, Little Chief, Kone, Blue Shirt, Big Elk, Old Elk, Opecarry, Old Battestie, Tintic, Portservic, Sowiet, Angatewats, Petnick, Walkara, Graspero, Niequia, and Antero extend their welcome to Brigham Young and his followers, they were unaware of the bloodshed that would follow.

In Remembrance of Timpanogos Leaders and Warriors

CHIEF BEAR HUNTER • CHIEF ANTOÑGA NUCH (BLACK HAWK) • CHIEF KANOSH • CHIEF KONE • CHIEF LEHI • CHIEF PETEETNEET • CHIEF POCATELLO • CHIEF SAGWITCH • CHIEF SANPITCH • CHIEF TABBY • CHIEF TINTIC • CHIEF WALKARA • CHIEF WANSHIP • CHIEF TABIONA • CHIEF YENE-WOODS (Jake Arropeen) • SOW-E-ETT (nearly starved) • KON-OSH (man of white hair) • TABBY (the sun) • TO-QUO-NE (black mountain lion) • SOW-OK-SOO-BET (arrow feather) • AN-KAR-TEW-ETS (red boy) • SAN-PITCH (bull rush) • KIBETS (mountain) • AM-OOSH AN-KAR-AW-KEG (red rifle) • NAUP-PEADES (foot mother) • PAN-SOOK (otter) • PEAN-UP (big foot) • EAH-LAND (shot to pieces) • NAR-I-ENT (powerful) • QUE-O-LAND (bear) • LITTLE CHIEF • LITTLE WOLF • LITTLE FEREMOTZ • OLD BATTISTE • OLD BILL • OLD DOCTOR BILL • OLD ELK  • OLD MAREER • OLD PENNICH • CHIEF SAU-E-ETT • OLD SAWIET • OPECARRY (Stick In The Head) • PAH-VANTS • PANACARA • PANTS • SAM (Toady) • SANTICK • SHEGUMP • SKIPOKE • TOMWANTS • TACKWITCH • SEE-GO-ETT • TOW-ICH • NAR-A-COOTS • TO-A-BITCH • PE-DO • TO-NE-OO • OBER-ICH • SO-NEEP • WILLIAM • KID-IP • SAM • KUB-ER-UUP • CHARLEY • OLD JOHN • KAR AN KEG • PEAN UP • EBAH SAND • BNARIENT • KAR TEW ITS • PAMSOOKQUOGAND

The above names I have collected from history records as I came upon them. The spellings are as I found them. All are from the Timpanogos Tribe. Names were spelled according to how they sound when spoken. For more First People names click here.

"American Indian" battles in the war of extermination of the Native Americans

* BATTLE OF ORISKANY (1777) * WYOMING VALLEY MASSACRE (1778) * CHERRY VALLEY MASSACRE (1778) * SULLIVAN EXPEDITION (1779) * BATTLE OF BLUE LICKS (1782) * NORTHWEST INDIAN WAR (1785–1795) * NICKAJACK EXPEDITION (1794) * SABINE EXPEDITION (1806) * WAR OF 1812 (WESTERN THEATRE), WHICH INCLUDED: * TECUMSEH'S WAR (1811-1813) * PEORIA WAR (1813) * CREEK WAR (1813–1814) * SEMINOLE WARS (1812, 1817–1818, 1835–1842, 1855–1858) * ARIKARA WAR (1823) * FEVER RIVER WAR (1827) * LE FÈVRE INDIAN WAR (1827) * BLACK HAWK WAR (1832) * PAWNEE INDIAN TERRITORY CAMPAIGN (1834) * CREEK WAR OF 1836, AKA SECOND CREEK WAR OR CREEK ALABAMA UPRISING (1835-1837) * MISSOURI-IOWA BORDER WAR (1836) * SOUTHWESTERN FRONTIER (SABINE) DISTURBANCES (NO FIGHTING) (1836–1837) * CHEROKEE UPRISING (1836-1838) * OSAGE INDIAN WAR (1837) * CAYUSE WAR (1848–1855) * NAVAJO WARS (1849–1861) O LONG WALK OF THE NAVAJO (1863–1868) * SOUTHWEST INDIAN WARS (1849-1863) * PITT RIVER EXPEDITION (1850) * MARIPOSA WAR (1850–1851) * YUMA EXPEDITION (1851–1852) * UTAH INDIAN WARS (1851-1853) * WALKER WAR (1853) * GRATTAN MASSACRE (1855) * YAKIMA WAR (1855) * SNAKE RIVER WAR (1855) * KLICKITAT WAR (1855) * PUGET SOUND WAR (1855–1856) * ROGUE RIVER WARS (1855–1856) * KLAMATH AND SALMON INDIAN WARS (1855) * TINTIC WAR (1856) * GILA EXPEDITION (1857) * MENDOCINO WAR (1858) * SPOKANE-COEUR D'ALENE-PALOOS WAR (1858) * PECOS EXPEDITION (1859) * ANTELOPE HILLS EXPEDITION (1859) * BEAR RIVER EXPEDITION (1859) * PAIUTE WAR (1860) * KIOWA-COMANCHE WAR (1860) * CHEYENNE CAMPAIGN (1861–1864) * DAKOTA WAR OF 1862 (1862) * BEAR RIVER MASSACRE (1863)* COLORADO WAR (1863–1865) *CIRCLEVILLE MASSACRE (1866) * KIDDER MASSACRE (1867) * SNAKE WAR (1864–1868) * UTAH'S BLACK HAWK WAR (1865–1872) * RED CLOUD'S WAR (1866–1868) * COMANCHE WARS (1867–1875) * BATTLE OF WASHITA RIVER (1868) * MARIAS MASSACRE (1870) * MODOC WAR (1872–1873) * RED RIVER WAR (1874) * APACHE WARS (1873, 1885–1886) * EASTERN NEVADA EXPEDITION (1875) * BLACK HILLS WAR (1876–1877) * NEZ PERCE WAR (1877) * BANNOCK WAR (1878) * CHEYENNE WAR (1878–1879) * SHEEPEATER INDIAN WAR (1879) * WHITE RIVER WAR (1879) * UTE WAR (1879-1880) * GHOST DANCE WAR (1890–1891) * WOUNDED KNEE MASSACRE (1890) * BATTLE OF LEECH LAKE (1898) * NEW MEXICO NAVAJO WAR (1913) * COLORADO PAIUTE WAR (1915) * AIM TAKEOVERS (1969 - 75) * SENECA INDIAN NATION STANDOFF AND NEW YORK STATE THRUWAY BLOCKADE (1997)

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